04 5 / 2012

lovelymistakes:

#books (Taken with instagram)

lovelymistakes:

#books (Taken with instagram)

08 3 / 2012

Just watched this!

Just watched this!

(Source: thefatboylarry)

08 3 / 2012

(Source: noize-seragaki)

27 1 / 2012

25 1 / 2012

25 1 / 2012

Haunted Orphanage

Haunted Orphanage

04 1 / 2012

04 1 / 2012

04 1 / 2012

02 1 / 2012

02 1 / 2012

01 1 / 2012


According to a local urban lengend, the road is named for a troop of Boy scouts who were killed while on a camping trip in the 1950s or 60s. In some variations the murderer is the troop’s Scout master. In others it is their bus driver.In other versions of the legend, a small group of Scouts leave their camp during the night and accidentally drop their lantern, resulting in a forest fire that kills the entire troop.
Other variations of the story exist including one in which the scouts are killed after their bus crashes or accidentally catches fire. There is also a version in which the scouts vanish without explanation and are never found. In some versions of the legend, two boy scouts escaped the fate of the rest of the troop and tried to find help, only to become lost in the woods where they die of starvation and/or exposure. In most variations of the legend it is said that the dead scouts haunt the forest where they died and can be heard hiking through the undergrowth, or their lights can be seen at night as they seek help or their fellow scouts.
There is an associated legend in which the killer (usually the Scout leader) hangs himself from a tree in the area after coming to terms with what he has done. In this legend, the tree is said to be an elm tree overhanging the road.
Stories circulated in “haunted travel guides” include visitors reporting a strong sense of foreboding or ‘being watched’, the sound of footsteps or breaking branches coming from multiple directions, red or white lights sometimes described as resembling swinging lanterns or flashlight beams, ghostly buses or figures, and ‘child-like hand prints’ on cars stopped in or driven through the area.

According to a local urban lengend, the road is named for a troop of Boy scouts who were killed while on a camping trip in the 1950s or 60s. In some variations the murderer is the troop’s Scout master. In others it is their bus driver.In other versions of the legend, a small group of Scouts leave their camp during the night and accidentally drop their lantern, resulting in a forest fire that kills the entire troop.

Other variations of the story exist including one in which the scouts are killed after their bus crashes or accidentally catches fire. There is also a version in which the scouts vanish without explanation and are never found. In some versions of the legend, two boy scouts escaped the fate of the rest of the troop and tried to find help, only to become lost in the woods where they die of starvation and/or exposure. In most variations of the legend it is said that the dead scouts haunt the forest where they died and can be heard hiking through the undergrowth, or their lights can be seen at night as they seek help or their fellow scouts.

There is an associated legend in which the killer (usually the Scout leader) hangs himself from a tree in the area after coming to terms with what he has done. In this legend, the tree is said to be an elm tree overhanging the road.

Stories circulated in “haunted travel guides” include visitors reporting a strong sense of foreboding or ‘being watched’, the sound of footsteps or breaking branches coming from multiple directions, red or white lights sometimes described as resembling swinging lanterns or flashlight beams, ghostly buses or figures, and ‘child-like hand prints’ on cars stopped in or driven through the area.

01 1 / 2012


The so-called “Gunkan-jima" (meaning "battleship island" in English), is a popular name given to Hashima Island located about 15 kilometres off the coast of Nagasaki, Japan. It once had a coal mining facility, and at its peak was the most densely populated place in the world; but now the place is completely deserted.

The island has numerous abandoned concrete buildings surrounded by a high wall which makes it look like a formidable marine fortress. Added to that the whole shape of it resembles the Japanese battleship “Tosa" so much that it has come to be known as "Battleship Island ". The rumour has it that during the second world war a US marine once hit it with a torpedo mistaking it for a battleship.

It is one of the most well-known ruins of Japan and its unique landscape and atmosphere continue to fascinate and capture the imagination of people today.
Visits to the island is officially prohibited but some people still manage to sneak in there anyway!
Apparently Nagasaki City has started to do restoration work on some parts of the island from this year in order to make a public viewing possible.

The so-called “Gunkan-jima" (meaning "battleship island" in English), is a popular name given to Hashima Island located about 15 kilometres off the coast of Nagasaki, Japan. It once had a coal mining facility, and at its peak was the most densely populated place in the world; but now the place is completely deserted.
The island has numerous abandoned concrete buildings surrounded by a high wall which makes it look like a formidable marine fortress. Added to that the whole shape of it resembles the Japanese battleship “Tosa" so much that it has come to be known as "Battleship Island ". The rumour has it that during the second world war a US marine once hit it with a torpedo mistaking it for a battleship.

It is one of the most well-known ruins of Japan and its unique landscape and atmosphere continue to fascinate and capture the imagination of people today.
Visits to the island is officially prohibited but some people still manage to sneak in there anyway!

Apparently Nagasaki City has started to do restoration work on some parts of the island from this year in order to make a public viewing possible.